Collaborative Agreement With A Physician



A CPA is a legal document forming the relationship between an NP and a caregiver. CPA requirements vary from state to state and are regulated by the Nursing Board of Directors, but as a general rule, they all require an NP who has some degree of oversight from a physician. Julie Nyhus, FNP-BC, explains that the purpose of a CPA is “to allow both parties involved to be aware of the functions of np.” They also allow both parties to define the requirements for the supervision of a medical caregiver. It is possible that your cooperating doctor has a document that you can use as a starting point. If not, check with a lawyer or other nurse to see if they have any standard documents to customize for your own use. (Links to the examples below.) And as with any legally binding agreement, you should have the contract checked by a lawyer before signing. Once the CPA is established, Nyhus recommends that both parties review and revert the document jointly. Before signing, the ideal would be for your own lawyers to also check the agreement. This can help you not miss anything, and it gives you the opportunity for your lawyer to explain all the parts of the document that you didn`t understand. Anyone involved in the CPA should consider having their own lawyer in order to avoid any conflict of interest. If you set off on your own, remember that your experience, sharp skills, risk management strategy and strong team position you for success. And count on your cooperating doctors whenever you want – that`s why they`re here! As a professional courtesy and to preserve the integrity of your CPA, you should contact your cooperating doctor regularly. Here are the typical sections to include in a contract with a cooperating doctor.

Define the duration (i.e. length) of the agreement and the circumstances under which it can be modified or terminated. And while your state may not legally require this contractual agreement, you might need to create a contract to formalize your relationship with any doctor you work with. You can do this to outline different responsibilities and continue to protect yourself and your business. Describe the policies your team will follow to contact the doctor: when, how and for what purpose. This is most likely based on your state`s nursing practices law and the type of practice you are participating in. The short answer is no. You should only enter into a cooperation contract with a doctor if you work in a state that reduces or limits your power of practice. . . .